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Grupo de Suporte

Público·10 membros
Maverick Torres
Maverick Torres

WORLD EVENTS ASIA


American history and world history can be found at historycental- History's home on the web. Explore our complete time lines of major events in American history as well as World History. Research our special sections on diverse subjects ranging from presidential elections to naval history. Whatever aspect of history you wish learn about, you will find it at Historycentral.com




WORLD EVENTS ASIA



Japanese master chef Masaharu Morimoto is known worldwide for his singular interpretations of Chinese, Japanese and Korean dishes. His unique culinary perspective and unforgettable cuisine is matched only by his gorgeously-executed locations, including Morimoto Asia.


As the largest trade show organiser in Asia, Informa Markets connects more than 60,000 exhibitors at our 230+ events, providing the ultimate B2B platform to conduct business. Many of our exhibitions have been around for decades and are the leading events for their specific industry in that country, region, and even the world. We combine local expertise with a global industry network to provide high-quality events and best in class customer experience for event attendees from around the world.


With 5 offices throughout the region, our diverse group of over 450 colleagues combines local expertise with a global industry network to create key gateways to the European market. From leading events such as CPhI Worldwide and PharmaPack, as well as IFSEC International and Brand Licensing Europe, to celebrations of regional artisans and design including Decorex and Sleep & Eat, we provide best-in-class events and exceptional customer experiences for exhibitors, attendees and experts from all over the world.


Informa Markets is among the top events organisers in South America. Our South America region has more than 250 employees and organises more than 30 major trade events annually as well as a diverse offering of digital products, services and specialist content. We serve industries and specialist markets including agriculture, communications, food & beverage, health, infrastructure, machinery, renewable energy and technology among others.From leading events such as Hospitalar, Intermodal South America, Futurecom, and Agrishow, we create opportunities for colleagues and customers by creating and connecting communities through our events.


After two years of hiatus due to the pandemic, Asia CopperWeek returns to in-person meetings in Singapore, bringing together the world'scopper mining industry with its smelter peers and other relevant actorsinvolved in the industry, giving attendees latestmarket updates and the opportunity to network during this vital contract negotiation season.


Fires raging in Indonesia. Fisheries collapsing off Peru. Delayed monsoon rains over India. Floods and mosquito-borne disease outbreaks in South America. Epic drought and mass migrations in southern Africa. Once an El Niño is declared, it seems every extreme weather-related event in the world is blamed on this phenomenon.


El Niño is the largest natural disruption to the Earth system, with direct impacts across most of the Pacific Ocean. Indirect impacts reverberate around the globe in patterns that scientists refer to as "teleconnections." Scientists are actively trying to understand how these changes in weather patterns in one area can alter the movement of air masses and winds in areas adjacent to and even far away from the source. According to the International Research Institute for Climate and Society at Columbia University, El Niño-Southern Oscillation is responsible for as much as 50 percent of year-to-year climate variability in some regions of the world.


While the impacts of an El Niño are predominately felt in the tropical Pacific, the massive reorganization of ocean heat, clouds, rainfall, and winds can affect weather patterns in other parts of the world. The atmospheric jet stream becomes faster and shifts its position, displacing the usual location of high- and low-pressure systems and altering normal storm tracks. This, in turn, modifies wet and dry areas, causing some places to experience droughts while others may get floods, landslides, and a redistribution of groundwater.


The UNWTO Commission Meetings are UNWTOs principal annual events in the Asia and the Pacific region, which will be attended by participants from the UNWTO Member States, UNWTO Affiliate Members, and international and regional organizations. Key topics to be discussed this year will include:


Asia is well positioned to address these challenges and capture the opportunities that come from managing climate risk effectively. Infrastructure and urban areas are still being built out in many parts of Asia, which gives the region a chance to ensure that what goes up is more resilient and better able to withstand heightened risk. At the same time, key economies in the region, such as China and Japan, are leading the world in technologies, from electric vehicles to renewable energy, that are necessary to adapt to and mitigate climate change.


By 2050, parts of Asia may see increasing average temperatures, lethal heat waves, extreme precipitation events, severe hurricanes, drought, and changes in water supply, based on RCP 8.5. We illustrate these hazards with maps that show local areas where impacts are most likely to be more severe, more frequent, or both over the coming decades (Exhibit 1).


Frontier Asia consists of Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan. These countries could see extreme increases in heat and humidity, which may significantly affect workability and livability. By 2050, their average temperatures are projected to rise by two to four degrees Celsius, and they could face much higher probabilities of lethal heat waves. By 2050, they could see extreme precipitation events more frequently than in the second half of the 20th century and may experience less drought. Climate change would also have the biggest negative impact on Asian crop yield in this group of countries.


Emerging Asia consists of major Southeast Asian countries: Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. Like Frontier Asia, these countries are projected to see extreme increases in heat and humidity by 2050 (although potentially less extreme than in Frontier Asia), and growing exposure to extreme precipitation events. The impact on workability will be significant for these countries due to their high percentage of work taking place in outdoor and labor-intensive sectors.


Assets and infrastructure services could increasingly come under threat from climate hazards such as floods in Tokyo and wildfires in Australia. In the case of Tokyo, we estimate the impact of a compound flood event of simultaneous one-in-100-year rainfall, streamflow, and storm surge events both today and in 2050 (Exhibit 5).5Tokyo is vulnerable to all three sources of flooding: fluvial, pluvial, and coastal. To simulate the worst-case scenario, all three flood sources were used as inputs to model the 24-hour compound flood event. In this context, the compound flood event is defined as the flood extent caused by the 1-in-100-year rainfall, streamflow, and storm surge events occurring simultaneously. The 1-in-100-year rainfall, streamflow, and storm surge values were calculated independently from each other using various data sources. However, this does not mean that the rainfall, streamflow, and storm surge events are probabilistically independent of each other. The probability of an extreme storm surge event can be higher when conditioned on the occurrence of extreme precipitation compared to the probability of extreme storm surge estimated when assuming the two events are independent, for example. Therefore, in order to avoid underestimating flood risk, all three flood sources were modeled together to provide a realistic estimate of the 1-in-100-year flood event. See technical appendix for further details.


See Technical appendix, Climate risk and response: Physical hazards and socioeconomic impacts, McKinsey Global Institute, January 2020, for why we chose RCP 8.5. Following standard practice, climate state today is defined as average conditions between 1998 and 2017, in 2030 as average between 2021 and 2040, and in 2050 as average between 2041 and 2060. To simulate the worst-case scenario, all three flood sources were used as inputs to model the 24-hour compound flood event. In this context the compound flood event is defined as the flood extent caused by the 1-in-100-year flood rainfall, streamflow, and storm surge events occurring simultaneously. The 1-in-100-year flood rainfall, streamflow, and storm surge values were calculated independently from each other using various data sources. These events are not independent, and this was done therefore in order to avoid underestimating flood risk and to provide a realistic estimate of the 1-in-100-year flood event. See Technical appendix for further details.


Measures to protect people and assets include: hardening assets, such as reinforcing or elevating physical assets and infrastructure; building green defenses, such as restoring natural defenses and ecosystems; and building gray defenses that reduce the severity or duration of climate events, such as disaster relief community shelters. For example, in a typical year, Kuala Lumpur experiences flash flooding. The Malaysian government has introduced flood controls by increasing river channel capacity, building a highway tunnel, and channeling water to holding ponds. The entire project provides storage for three million cubic meters of water, sufficient to offset most of the flooding in a typical year.7Special Unit for South-South Cooperation, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, UNDP. 041b061a72


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